Globalization: Social & Geographic Perspectives

a qwriting.qc.cuny.edu blog

In Israel/The Christian Revolution

May 10th, 2011 · 1 Comment
Uncategorized

The audio clip In Israel, When A Jew Is Not Jewish enough provided an insight into how American-Conservative Jews are treated in Israel. Having grown up Orthodox and no longer consider myself a religious person, I find it absurd that Jonathan was not allowed to serve in the army. I have several Israeli friends who currently serve in the army and they are not remotely religious, nor do they consider themselves Jewish. Rather, they consider themselves Israeli. However because they were born in Israel, they are allowed to serve. However, this person who comes from America, who associates with the Jewish religion and wants to fight and die for the country he believes is his is not allowed to simply based on a technicality. After hearing about how the Orthodox, and Ultra-Orthodox communities in Israel reacted to the army’s conversion program I felt ashamed to have come from an Orthodox (albeit a modern Orthodox) up bringing. It amazes me that in this time when it seems that most of the world is against Israel, they are still finding ways to turn people away from not only the faith, but the defense of our country.
This situation is completely different from the one portrayed in Jenkins’ article “The Christian Revolution”. His article talks about how Christianity is booming in a way. The religion is spreading throughout the world-as far as some remote villages throughout Africa. The Christian religion is working at spreading itself throughout the world. It appears that the world-wide Christian movement is working to open itself in a way while the Jewish religion in Israel is working to become more narrow and less loosely defined. I think the Jewish religion should take a look at what the Christians are doing and understand that in modern times, having a more open religion is a good thing especially in order to have a strong religion.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email



1 response so far ↓

  • 1    Kurman100 // May 15, 2011 at 10:00 pm

    While I see your point, the Jewish religion strongly discourages conversion while Christianity looks to recruit beleiveres. It si considered a great honor for a Christian to convert people to their religion. However, in Judaism one has to approach a Rabbia and ask to convert three times before the Rabbi .even considers allowing them to convert.

You must log in to post a comment.