Globalization: Social & Geographic Perspectives

a qwriting.qc.cuny.edu blog

Blog #2 Border Wars-Libya/ABCs

April 26th, 2011 · 2 Comments
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In Border Wars-Libya we are given a first hand look at what the refugees fleeing Libya have to go through. These people are extremely brave. They are fleeing their own country, their own homes with little or no possession because they fear for their lives. However, they are merely fleeing towards more problems. Food is scarce and it seems like there are daily riots simply because the U.N can’t feed all of the refugees. One thing that I found interesting about this is that the various media outlets are making it appear as though the UN and the Red Cross is helping these people but really, it is not doing enough. The women fleeing are also experiencing problems. One women interviewed was talking about the fear of being raped at night while going to the bathroom. Clearly security isn’t doing enough. The refugees are talking about being searched and beaten by Pro-Libyan forces and are also scared for their lives and the lives of family left in Libya and won’t talk about how life in Libya was. I could not imagine what it must be like to flee from ones home out of fear for their lives only to run into more problems and still be constantly afraid.

The second piece I’m using for this blog post was an audio interview with an Asian girl born in America talking about the differences between ABC’s (American born chinese) and FOB’s (fresh off the boat). These terms are used to differentiate between new Chinese immigrants and second or third generation Chinese immigrants. The audio clip talks about the various characteristics of ABC’s and FOB’s such as the way they dress, talk and their manners. She says the groups don’t get along and the ABC’s (and older generations) look down on the FOB’s. These issues aren’t unique to the Chinese immigrants. All the generations of various immigrants have these problems and most of them have to do with assimilation.

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2 responses so far ↓

  • 1    Prof. Hala // Apr 28, 2011 at 12:41 pm

    Absolutely, these issues are hardly unique to Chinese immigrants — we see them within all immigrant groups.

  • 2    peterjun // May 17, 2011 at 6:17 pm

    One defense of the Red Cross and UN is that there is no control on the number of fleeing refugees so having enough man power to have a calm quiet exodus is unrealistic. I understand that they are tryin to help but try to see it in a large scheme of things. Its not just the Libyan border that has refugees but all over the world and NGO’s are tryin to help them all. We can get into an argument of triage but then can we really place one human life over another?

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