Globalization: Social & Geographic Perspectives

a qwriting.qc.cuny.edu blog

Blog #5 Chinese Americans and Libya Border Wars

April 24th, 2011 · 1 Comment
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The ABC’s of Chinese Americans

While reading the article about Chinese Americans here in Flushing, New York, I was surprised to see the way that older immigrants viewed the newer wave of immigrants from Asia.  As New Yorkers, most of us have heard or witnessed several stereotypes, such as Asian immigrants who spit or seem very rude.  Obviously this isn’t necessarily true for all Asian immigrants, but it was interesting to see that the Asian immigrants who have been living here for a long time look down to the new waves of Asian immigrants who uphold these stereotypes.  From a cultural view, I expected immigrants to stand up for their own Asian cultures, where spitting is not considered rude, yet immigrants who have been here a long time seem to have “caught on” and adopted the American culture, where spitting isn’t a proper thing to do.  Even more intriguing was that older Chinese immigrants did not want to go into Chinese owned supermarkets because of how rude they might be treated.  Although the older immigrants understand why the new immigrants act the way they do, they no longer consider it proper.

Border Wars- Libya

Lately it seems like Libya has fallen out of the spotlight here in America. What was once the focus of every news station seems to have been pushed to the backburner while struggles for freedom still go on in Libya.  Colonel Gadaffi still holds control in several parts of the country and seems to have strong military influence backing him up.  As the civil war ensues, the real victims are being hidden from the world as Gadaffi tries to keep the lid on the deteriorating condition of his nation’s citizens.  The video gives a real world view of what is going on in Libya.  Individuals have had their whole lives taken away from them, including their homes, loved ones, and safety.  Even after they’ve been stripped of everything, these individuals fear that even more may be taken from them.  Men, women, and children running from Libya are fearful to express how they really feel and when questioned they feel the need to lie about the conditions in order to protect themselves or their loved ones.  There is a clear sense of fear that Gadaffi may eventually win this battle for control and the citizens who fought against him will be punished.  Those fearful enough to give up everything they once had and leave should be granted at least some form of safety from any of the countries in the world.  While America has been busy balancing the federal budget for the last decade there are individuals in the world who have bigger problems than politics.

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1 response so far ↓

  • 1    Prof. Hala // Apr 28, 2011 at 12:10 pm

    Indeed, the splits/divisions among immigrants, even — or especially — those from the same country are significant and under-appreciated. Another key split is between legal and illegal immigrants, of course.

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