blog#2

As I read Mittelman’s article about organized crime and its effects around the world, I could not help thinking that all this could have probably been prevented. Why do governments believe it is necessary for them to control the morals of their populations? In the United States, we are brought up to believe that we have certain freedoms. Why is it that we cannot decide for ourselves what is good or bad. Yes, the government should advise us of the dangers around us. For example, cigarette packages have warnings all over them, but they are still legal. Why not legalize drugs, gambling, prostitution, and other concentual crimes? The taxes made from these current illegal activities would be enormous, and they would have gone a long way towards elimanating a large percentage of  organized crime’s profit. Now that organized crime has entered into other areas of activity, it may be much harder to defeat them.

In its own way, Wall Street is a form of organized crime. Bethany McLean tells us how these educated criminals, through extreme greed and matching incompetence, have managed to cause a financial collapse. This collapse which caused millions to lose their jobs and countless careless home buyers to lose their homes and savings, did little to hurt the people on Wall Street for more than a short time. So while the middle class is still struggling to recover, the financial wizards are making more money than ever. Sounds criminal to me!

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5 Responses to “blog#2”

  1. I strongly believe that organized crime is making a come back. I totally agree with you when you say Wall Street might as well be organized crime. It makes me so angry when I hear horrible stories that come from Wall Street. NO ONE ever gets in trouble. Unless of course 2 teenage boys are making a bad decision because they decided to smoke a joint before class. Oh man, that’s going to cost them. It boggles my mind on how much the government gets involved on petty things rather then bigger issues. How about, we start making changes in the health system and education systems? If they care so much about anything is should be that. Love the term financial wizards! Perhaps we should all quit our studies and go work and learn amongst these “amazing, smart, TRUSTWORTHY” men that paved the pathway to the financial crisis!

  2. I strongly believe that organized crime is making a come back. I totally agree with you when you say Wall Street might as well be organized crime. It makes me so angry when I hear horrible stories that come from Wall Street. NO ONE ever gets in trouble. Unless of course 2 teenage boys are making a bad decision because they decided to smoke a joint before class. Oh man, that’s going to cost them. How about, we start making changes in the health system and education systems? If they care so much about anything is should be that. Love the term financial wizards! Perhaps we should all quit our studies and go work and learn amongst these “amazing, smart, TRUSTWORTHY” men that paved the pathway to the financial crisis!

  3. Samantha Plaut says:

    Your point about drugs being legal is very interesting. I never thought of it that way before, and it sounds good in a sense, but if you look at the bigger picture it will turn out bad. Yes, cigarettes are legal and there are warnings, but that doesn’t mean that people aren’t becoming even more addicted daily! If drugs are legal it’ll be so much easier access for those who want it, and for people to begin using it. This can have positive and negative effects, as you said it could help with the organized crime issue. A lot of the time I feel that some things that government does doesn’t always make perfect sense.

  4. Prof. Hala says:

    I get your frustration with the government imposing morals on society, Alex. At the same time, I wish the our government representatives would take a stand against immorality, in the form of financial crime. To take it out of the moral dimension, perhaps, the government should at least stand for justice and enforce the law. And enforce it in a more even-handed way — rather than devoting such enormous resources to low-level marijuana arrests (NYC/NYPD leads the world in this), they shift those resources to prosecute white collar crime in a serious way.

    Love your expressive and lively response, Rachel. I think a lot of people share your perspective, which seems to combine outrage with a sense of resignation.

    Another interesting thread in everyone’s comments is the characterization of government as kind of alien, certainly not something that we actually control, which is supposed to be the defining feature of a democracy.

  5. astein102 says:

    The purpose of knowing history is to learn from it. The United States tried Prohibition in 1920, and only succeeded in creating organized crime, on a large scale. Unfortunately, it is only human nature to try and profit on another’s weakness, be it drugs, gambling, or prostitution. By making these illegal, we have created world-wide crime organizations that rival nation-states. We only have to look at the chaos in Mexico to realize that organized crime has gotten too strong. It is only pragmatism that makes me advocate legalization, and I do not believe the availability of drugs will increse its usage, if the government handles it correctly.