Globalization: Social & Geographic Perspectives

a qwriting.qc.cuny.edu blog

Following up on Labor & the TCC…

February 23rd, 2011 · No Comments
Course Announcements

I will post slides on this and “The Rise of the Global Elite” shortly.

Collective bargaining: A collective agreement functions as a labor contract between an employer and one or more unions.  Collective bargaining consists of the process of negotiation between representatives of a union and employers in respect of the terms and conditions of employment, such as wages, hours of work, working conditions and grievance procedures, and about the rights and responsibilities of unions.

  • The US Congress enacted the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) in 1935 to protect the rights of employees and employers, to encourage collective bargaining and to curtail certain private sector labor and management practices, which can harm the general welfare of workers, businesses and the U.S. economy.
  • Article 23 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights identifies the ability to organize trade unions as a fundamental human right. Item 2(a) of the International Labor Organization’s Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work defines the “freedom of association and the effective recognition of the right to collective bargaining” as an essential right of workers.

Highlights from the 2010 data from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics:

In 2010, the union membership rate–the percent of wage and salary workers who were members of a union–was 11.9 percent, down from 12.3 percent a year earlier, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported [1/21/2011]. The number of wage and salary workers belonging to unions declined by 612,000 to 14.7 million. In 1983, the first year for which comparable union data are available, the union membership rate was 20.1 percent, and there were 17.7 million union workers.

The data on union membership were collected as part of the Current Population Survey (CPS), a monthly sample survey of about 60,000 households that obtains information on employment and unemployment among the nation’s civilian noninstitutional population age 16 and over.

  • The union membership rate for public sector workers (36.2%) was substantially higher than the rate for private sector workers (6.9%).
  • Workers in education, training, and library occupations had the highest unionization rate at 37.1%.
  • Black workers were more likely to be union members than were white, Asian, or Hispanic workers.
  • Among states, New York had the highest union membership rate (24.2 %) and North Carolina had the lowest rate (3.2 %).

From today’s Daily News: “Wisconsin protests: Gov. Scott Walker got big bucks from billionaire Tea Party fundraisers”.  The article refers to the Koch brothers, noted by Freeland in the Global Elites article as two of the top ten wealthiest Americans.

For more background and news on the Wisconsin protests:

“State Budgets and Public Unions,” The Diane Rehm Show, WAMU/NPR, 2/21/2011

GritTV special from Madison, Wisconsin, 2/22/2011

This Editor’s blog, from Kai Wright of Colorlines considers “How much of the current demonization of public workers is racialized?”:

“Who Are All These Evil Public Workers? Black People”

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Collective bargaining: A collective agreement functions as a labor contract between an employer and one or more unions. Collective bargaining consists of the process of negotiation between representatives of a union and employers (generally represented by management, in some countries[which?] by an employers’ organization) in respect of the terms and conditions of employment of employees, such as wages, hours of work, working conditions and grievance-procedures, and about the rights and responsibilities of trade unions. The parties often refer to the result of the negotiation as a collective bargaining agreement (CBA) or as a collective employment agreement (CEA).

Article 23 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights identifies the ability to organize trade unions as a fundamental human right.[3] Item 2(a) of the International Labour Organization’s Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work defines the “freedom of association and the effective recognition of the right to collective bargaining” as an essential right of workers.[4]

NLRB (1935)

In 2010, the union membership rate--the percent of wage and salary workers who were members of a union--was 11.9 percent, down from 12.3 percent a year earlier, the U.S.Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. The number of wage and salary workers belonging to unions declined by 612,000 to 14.7 million. In 1983, the first year for which comparable union data are available, the union membership rate was 20.1 percent, and there were 17.7 million union workers.
The data on union membership were collected as part of the Current Population Survey (CPS), a monthly sample survey of about 60,000 households that obtains information on employment and unemployment among the nation's civilian noninstitutional population age 16 and over.
Highlights from the 2010 data:
--The union membership rate for public sector workers (36.2%) was
substantially higher than the rate for private sector workers (6.9%).
--Workers in education, training, and library occupations had the highest
unionization rate at 37.1%.
--Black workers were more likely to be union members than were white, Asian, or Hispanic workers.
--Among states, New York had the highest union membership rate (24.2 percent) and North Carolina had the lowest rate (3.2 percent).

WE ARE BROKE, WE HAVE TO TIGHTEN OUR BELTS!!!!

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